Mercury Montego Parts and Accessories: Automotive: Amazon.com

17 Aug 2014 | Author: | Comments Off on Mercury Montego Parts and Accessories: Automotive: Amazon.com
Mercury Montego

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About This Model

In 1966 Mercury moved the Comet up one size class to an intermediate-sized platform, which it shared with Ford#39;s Fairlane. This strategy made sense in that the intermediate size was getting some serious attention from buyers, but had the tactical flaw of using a nameplate that had been associated with smaller, less costly cars. Mercury addressed this issue in 1968 by introducing a lavishly.

In 1966 Mercury moved the Comet up one size class to an intermediate-sized platform, which it shared with Ford#39;s Fairlane. This strategy made sense in that the intermediate size was getting some serious attention from buyers, but had the tactical flaw of using a nameplate that had been associated with smaller, less costly cars. Mercury addressed this issue in 1968 by introducing a lavishly equipped version of the Comet, called the Montego.

The following year the Comet name was dropped, and Mercury#39;s intermediates would all be Montegos through the 1976 model year. During that period the Montego#39;s equipment and powertrain rosters would echo those of its near-twin, the Ford Torino. (The Comet name would return in 1971, on Mercury#39;s version of the Ford Maverick.)

Mercury Montego

The Montego rode on a 116 inch wheelbase (113 inches for the wagons), was 206 inches long, and weighed, depending on body style and powertrain, between 3,000 and 3,400 pounds. Power was provided by a standard 115 horsepower 200 c.i. in-line six, or optional V8 engines of up to 390 cubic inches.

For its first two years the Montego could be had in a full array of body configurations: four-door sedan and wagon, two-door hardtop, and convertible. In addition to the base model, Montego buyers were offered a more lavishly equipped MX upgrade. It included consisted of a vinyl roof, full-length body trim, chrome wheel well moldings, fake wood door panel appliques and (get this!) carpeted floors.

Even further up the line was the MX Brougham. The convertible was dropped for 1970, but the Montego could now be had as an airy four-door hardtop. Styling got more dramatic that year as well, with the larger models#39; front-end styling being carried through the line to the Montego.

The standard six grew to 250 cubic inches, and the range of engine options grew.

The Montego marched in lockstep with the Torino for 1972, getting new sheetmetal. The wheelbase of the two-door models shrunk two inches, while the four-door chassis grew by the same amount and was now used for the wagon as well. All Montegos now used body-on-frame construction, rather than the unitized configuration of the previous generation (wagon excepted).

The four-door hardtop was dropped from the line. The Cyclone (addressed in a separate section) was discontinued, at least in name, and replaced by the Montego GT. The 1973 Montego was little changed from the previous year, but in 1974 the six-cylinder engine was dropped and an enormous 460 c.i.

V8 became available. During its last three years on the market, the Montego followed the industry trend of offering less power due to increasingly stringent emissions standards. The last Montego in this series coincided with the nation#39;s bicentennial, after which time the name would go on hiatus for nearly three decades.

The Montego name returned in 2005, gracing the flanks of what was generally acknowledged to be the marque#39;s replacement for its Sable. As with the Sable, Mercury#39;s car was based on a Ford. In this case it was the Five Hundred (intended to replace the Taurus). The new Montego was exceptionally roomy, and in standard form its 203 horsepower 3.0-liter Duratec DOHC V6 drove the front wheels via a six-speed automatic transmission.

All-wheel drive was available, as was a CVT stepless automatic transmission. Both Ford and Mercury sold the newly-named cars for two years, at which point someone said let#39;s give these cars names people have heard of. Thus, for 2007 the Montego became the Sable, and the Five Hundred became the Taurus.

And Montego remains a lovely bay in Jamaica.

Mercury Montego
Mercury Montego
Mercury Montego
Mercury Montego
Mercury Montego
Mercury Montego
Mercury Montego
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