Drive – Audi A4 Avant Review

2 Nov 2014 | Author: | Comments Off on Drive – Audi A4 Avant Review
Audi A4

Cameron McGavin

Make AUDI Model A4 Price $57,800 (CVT only) Series 2.0 TDI MULTITRONIC Series Year 2009 Body Group sedan What’s it got? Eight airbags, stability control, ABS with EBD and BA, dual-zone climate control, cruise control, trip computer, automatic headlights/wipers, CD player, leather-clad multi-function steering wheel, 16-inch alloy wheels.

Make an enquiry

All the talk might be of doom and gloom these days but Audi is bucking the trend, with record sales in January. The company’s fortunes have no doubt been aided by its staggering new-model rollout, which shows no sign of slowing.

The latest Audi to hit local shores is the Avant, or wagon, version of the new-generation A4 launched here last year.

#160;

#160;

What do you get?

It might be a wagon but the Avant’s styling is anything but utilitarian. It’s hard to argue with Audi’s claim that it’s the best-looking vehicle in its class.

For now, at least, it is available with a choice of two engines. The range kicks off with the 1.8 TFSI petrol model at $56,400, while the diesel-powered 2.0 TDI tested here costs $57,800.

Both models share the same serve of dual-zone climate control, cruise control, trip computer, auto headlights-wipers, leather, CD player, multi-function steering wheel and 16-inch alloy wheels.

#160;

#160;

Like the A4 sedan, the Avant gets eight airbags, anti-lock brakes, stability control and a five-star NCAP rating.

If you want parking sensors or a reversing camera, however, you’ll have to tick some boxes on the typically long options list. Handy blindspot warning and lane-departure warning systems are also available.

#160;

#160;

What’s inside?

The Avant’s load-carrying abilities aren’t to be sneezed at. Capacity with the back seats up is a handy 490 litres – more than BMW’s 3- Series and Benz’s C-Class wagons – and expands to 1430L when the seats are folded down.

It’s supremely user-friendly, too, thanks to a low loading lip, luggage tie-downs and handy reversible floor. Elsewhere, the cabin mirrors that of the A4 sedan, meaning slick and attractive design, quality a step ahead of the rest, ample storage and switchgear that’s easy to use by upmarket Euro standards.

It’s functionally on the ball, too. The front-seat area is airy and spacious, while the driver enjoys a wide array of steering and seating adjustments.

#160;

#160;

Under the bonnet

With 105kW of power and 320Nm of torque, the 2.0 TDI engine cedes to other 2.0-litre diesel rivals on paper but the on-road impression is favourable.

A big contributor is the continuously variable transmission, which matches beautifully to the strong low-rev power and flexibility of the diesel engine.

With no gear changes to get in the way of the acceleration, performance is not only strong but deliciously smooth as well. And because the revs are held rather than rising up and down, the usual diesel clatter is kept to a minimum.

It’s economical, too. I couldn’t match Audi’s claimed 6.0L/100km average in combined urban-highway running but a 6.9L/100km return is undeniably thrifty for a wagon with space and toys to spare.

#160;

#160;

This is the first new A4 I’ve sampled without adaptive suspension and steering, and for my money the regular set-up is preferable.

The ride is the first positive. The last adaptive A4 I sampled crashed over bumps and generally felt restless, even in comfort mode, but this Avant soaked up everything I could throw at it – even rough gravel – with respectable absorbency.

Audi A4

There’s no sacrifice in going for the Avant, either. It feels just as lithe and light on its feet as its sedan siblings and, despite a touch more road noise, most drivers will be hard-pressed to tell they’re driving the load-lugger of the A4 range.

Mind you, in outright terms, even this non-adaptive A4’s road manners are some way short of setting new standards. The ride, while anything but bad, lacks the finesse of Benz’s C-Class and road noise is a constant companion when negotiating coarse-chip surfaces.

#160;

#160;

If the Avant’s driving skills were up to the standards of its styling, cabin packaging, drivetrain and quality, I wouldn’t hesitate to give it a five-star rating.

Still, if the Audi falls short of being truly brilliant, it nonetheless is arguably better than the sedan because it delivers extra practicality without any obvious sacrifice. If you’re seeking a compact European wagon, add it to your list.

Under the bonnet

With 105kW of power and 320Nm of torque, the 2.0 TDI engine cedes to other 2.0-litre diesel rivals on paper but the on-road impression is favourable.

A big contributor is the continuously variable transmission, which matches beautifully to the strong low-rev power and flexibility of the diesel engine.

With no gear changes to get in the way of the acceleration, performance is not only strong but deliciously smooth as well. And because the revs are held rather than rising up and down, the usual diesel clatter is kept to a minimum.

It’s economical, too. I couldn’t match Audi’s claimed 6.0L/100km average in combined urban-highway running but a 6.9L/100km return is undeniably thrifty for a wagon with space and toys to spare.

Competitors

Chrysler 300C CRD Touring

Distinctive looks, great value, quiet and comfy, road manners a bit lazy, cabin feels cheap, quality and safety not up to Euro rivals. 3/5. Price From $64,990.

Mercedes-Benz C220 CDi Classic Estate

Sharp handling, superb ride and refinement, strong diesel engine, comfy and practical cabin, good safety package, unremarkable back seat, gloomy cabin, lukewarm value. 4/5. Price From $61,993.

Volkswagen Passat 125 TDI Wagon

Tagged as:

Other articles of the category "Audi":

Twitter-news
Our partners
Follow us
Contact us
Our contacts

dima911@gmail.com

Born in the USSR

423360519

About this site

For all questions about advertising, please contact listed on the site.


Car Catalog with specifications, pictures, ratings, reviews and discusssions about cars